A data nerd’s perspective on Website Design

Recently I was working on a CRM data verification project which involved visiting close to two thousand websites over the period of a few days and it absolutely blew my mind. Not the scope and scale of the project itself, but what I learned about the value of good web design.

You had one job!
When it comes to designing your website, all of the fabulous plug ins, branding, corporate videos, advertising and search engine optimisation in the world are utterly wasted efforts if you have not considered the basic function of your website, which is to allow your customers to find out information about your company.
Whilst it is important to consider the journey of your customer to your site (via a tweet, a blog you shared on Facebook or LinkedIn, by Googling your business name – measuring the source of the visit empowers you to tailor your marketing activity accordingly) it is equally important to remember why they are there.

Are they there to find out what you do? Where you are? Are they there to find your contact information so they can call you with an enquiry? Look at your own website, are you meeting these basic requirements? Out of 1800 websites that I visited in order to check what the business did, find the postcode and phone number and their links to social media accounts only 22% of the websites allowed me to find this information easily. Seriously, 22%. That’s mind boggling.

We scrumpleswish your flibberts to provide value added burbleglumpfts and deliver visionglitter
So many of the companies had admittedly beautiful websites, but my experience was made so frustrating as a result of having to trawl through web copy which did not make it clear what the function of the business was. Jargon does not impress your audience, it alienates and frustrates them.

For the benefit of those who have learned from sales and marketing seminars or business books to “sell the benefits, not the features” (or rather to sell the sizzle not the steak…) your customers are not googling “I want to increase my business value proposition via the application of collaborative media integrations” they are googling a product or service in plain terms.

Navigation is key
However you choose to structure your site, it doesn’t matter whether the contact details are at the bottom, top, side of a page or whether they can be found via the menu – as long as they can easily be found. You should also consider the merits of a contact form versus giving your customer the option to call or email you directly.
Want an honest assessment of your website and constructive advice about how to make it more user friendly?
I offer a free hour of consultancy for small businesses so get in touch.

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